The Urology Group
 
Conditions We Treat / Men's Health / Testicular Pain

Testicular Pain


Testicular pain may result from a prior surgery, including a vasectomy, or from an injury, or from a medical condition such as an infection. Considerations for testicular pain: 
  • Orchitis is an inflammation of one or both testicles, most frequently caused by a bacterial infection. In some cases, bacterial orchitis can be caused by sexually transmitted infections, particularly gonorrhea or chlamydia. Symptoms include swelling in one or both testicles, pain ranging from mild to severe, tenderness in one or both testicles which may last for weeks, and in more severe cases, fever, nausea and vomiting.

    Men experiencing testicular pain, especially if it occurs suddenly, should see a physician as soon as possible. Medication can treat the causes of bacterial orchitis and ease some symptoms of viral orchitis.

     
  • Epididymitis is an inflammation of the coiled tube, called the epididymis, at the back of the testicle that stores and carries sperm. Epididymitis is most often caused by a bacterial infection, which can include a sexually transmitted infection such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. Symptoms may include a swollen, red or warm scrotum; testicle pain and tenderness, usually on one side; painful urination or a frequent need to urinate; discharge from the penis; painful intercourse or ejaculation; a lump on the testicle; or blood in the semen.

    Men experiencing testicular pain, espeically if it occurs suddenly, should see a physician as soon as possible. Antibiotics are needed to treat bacterial epididymitis, and if its cause is a sexually transmitted infection, the sexual partner also requires treatment. 

     
  • Is this cancer? Compared with other types of cancer, testicular cancer is rare. The primary symptom is a hard lump or enlargement in either testicle.  

    Men experiencing pain, swelling or a hard lump in the testicles or groin area should see a physician, especially if the symptoms have lasted longer than two weeks. If cancer is detected, an appropriate treatment plan can be determined in consultation with medical personnel based on the individual's condition and the stage of the disease. 

     
  • Referred pain occurs when pain actually originates from somewhere else in the groin or abdomen but is felt in one or both testicles. This most commonly occurs in cases of kidney stones and hernias. Men experiencing pain in this area, especially pain that persists for more than one week, should see a physician. 

 

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